FileFour (page 4 of 9)

Continuation of 'Ideas of How Dowsing Works'----

C. Processing Component: The brain is the central processing area for the signal detection and dowsing reaction process.  According to my reading of the research literature, the brain has proximal visual and thumb neural areas that each deal with the sensory and motor processing.  The thumbs' processing areas in the brain, and the associated neural pathways, are separate from those of the fingers. (illustrations from Thibodeau GA, Patton KI: Anatomy & Physiology, ed. 3, St. Louis, 1996, Mosby)

The brain appears to react to the stimulus of radiation picked up by the eyes and processes the signal input as neural activity.  The dowsing person generally is not consciously aware that there is a signal from a radiating object.  Also, I don't believe that the dowser causes the rods to move due to some type of very small involuntary muscle movements.

I have attempted to devise some simple, external body tests relative to the brain centers and neural pathways.  More extensive laboratory tests should be accomplished to measure the tiny electrical impulses of these brain centers and  neural pathways.  The following basic and rather interesting tests and results are my contribution to the idea that the brain is a significant component of the dowsing process.

Test C-1: With the normal dowsing setup, use only one L-rod.  Dowse the target with the one L-rod held in the right hand.
My results: the right rod moves.
Person #1 results: same as above.
Person #2 results: same as above.

Test C-2: Now using the same right hand and rod, dowse the target keeping the right eye closed.
My results: the rod does not move.
Person #1 results: same as above.
Person #2 results: The rod indicated a signal detection.

Test C-3: Using the same right hand and rod, and with the right eye closed, touch the top of the head (the crown which is the top of the head towards the back) with the thumb of the left hand......and dowse the target.
My results: the rod moves.
(
Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

Test C-4: Using the same right hand and rod, and with the right eye open, touch the crown of the head with the thumb of the left hand......and dowse the target.
My results: the rod does not move. (crossover interference?)
(
Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

Test C-5: Using the same right hand and rod, and with the right eye closed, touch the crown of the head with the fingers of the left hand.....and dowse the target.
My results: the rod does not move.
(
Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

Test C-6: Do the same test as above with the left hand fingers touching the crown of the head and the right eye open.
My results: the rod does not move.
(
Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

Test C-7: Vary the touch point on the head (see illustration) and perform the same tests both with the thumb and the fingers.
My results: only with the contact of the left thumb on the very top (crown) of the head, and with the right eye closed, does the rod move.
(
Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

An added note about the previous peculiar set of tests:  I have found variable results by touching certain points of the body both with the thumbs and fingers in seeking neural pathway activity.....that is, I have placed my thumb or finger in my ear, and had positive rod movement results........At this time I don't have a reasonable explanation for these variations.

So, if you have attempted the above rather strange tests and achieved results similar to mine, let's try another test using a headphone or headband and some contact wire.
Take a simple (cheap) headphone (or headband), wrap some exposed wiring around the top curve of the headband.  Use enough wire length to extend from the top of the head to the L-rod handle.
Attach a clip lead to the wire at the L-rod end.

Test C-8: Using the same right hand holding an L-rod as in the above tests, position the headband over the top (crown) of the head (with the exposed wiring wrapped around the curve of the headband and placed as close to the scalp as possible).  Connect the other end of the wire to the rod near the 90 degree bend between the handle and long length of the rod.

With this headband and wire connection setup, dowse the target with an L-rod in the right hand, only keeping your right eye open.
My results: The rod moves.
(Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

Test C-9: Now do the same dowsing test as above only close your right eye.
My results: the rod moves.
(
Note: Persons #1 & #2 not tested)

Note: you can perform the above tests with a wired headband using both right and left rods.
See if your results vary from what you would expect.

My basic conclusion from these test results and my interpretation of basic neural science research findings, is the following.  There appears to be some type of neural and/or electrical signals that travels via neural pathways through the body/arm/hand.  The external wire test from the very top of the head to the thumb and L-rod appears to mimic the neural pathway signals.  The body aura also appears to be a factor in driving the movement of the L-rod(s).

(End of page 4 of FileFour.......continue to page 5.)